How to control condensation this winter

 

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It can be the bane of our lives during the colder winter months, but trying to stop condensation in its tracks can be easy with just a few adjustments to your home or Garden Room. The main culprits are humidity and temperature, if you get this under control, you will find your living environment will be even more comfortable.

Whether we like it or not, condensation on glass is a natural occurrence in homes and Garden Rooms around the world, and cannot be completely avoided, no matter how incredibly insulated your space is. Follow these tips and tricks to getting your condensation under control:

Ventilation is key: Open your doors and windows and air your Garden Room evenly and regularly throughout the year. If you leave a Garden Room unattended for long periods of time, you may find condensation starts to appear in the colder months due to the lack of ventilation.

Open the trickle vents: A good manufacturer of windows and doors should include trickle ventilators on the frames. We use suppliers who include these vents, so just make sure to keep these open all year round for good ventilation in your Garden Studio, Office or Lodge.

Watch what you put into it: Whether it’s condensation in your home or Garden Room, always be careful what you put into it. Ie. Objects, pets and plants. Adding lots of plants or objects/and people, means you’ll create more humidity, which can add to your condensation worries.

Stabilise the internal temperature: A continual, low form of heat can provide the most cost-effective way of heating a room and reduces the risk of condensation.

Try a Dehumidifier: Remove moisture in a room with a Dehumidifier, and place it as near as you can to the offending windows.

Beware of cold winters: A sudden drop in temperature can be tricky to manage. So if the mercury is looking to hit a low, try keeping the heating on so that it can help deposit moisture more effectively. Laying condensation strips on the bottom of your windows and doors can also help collect moisture, without ruining paintwork or creating mould.

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